Train Thru The Pain Or Sit It Out


 

The Philosophy of putting aside discomfort in the name of fitness is not as extraordinary as it sounds. Many individuals who have an exercise regimen do that every day. Would you rather go to a gym after work when you would rather be heading out with friends for food? To a certain extent, sacrifice and self-denial are part of the culture of physical fitness. 

The most important thing is to be able to balance the need for exercise with the need to exercise common sense. Pain is your body’s way of telling you something’s wrong. If you haven’t varied your routine, and you’re suddenly beset by a cramp, spasm or other pain, stop what you’re doing for a few minutes and give it time to pass. If you try again and it persists, stop exercising for the day. If the pain is severe, see me immediately. If it’s simply discomfort, wait until your next regularly scheduled workout. If it’s still not gone, call for an appointment to give you peace of mind.

A certain amount of pain can be normal. The important difference here is in the degree. Soreness and slight discomfort are different from pain. Soreness should improve with a mild pain reliever (aspirin, Tylenol, etc.), a hot shower or a good rub. If you have true pain, you’re doing too much or doing something incorrectly, and you may have injured yourself and then it’s time to call me.

Playing sports is a great way to exercise, spend time with friends and family, and develop team-building skills. But did you know that ankle sprains and breaks are among the most common sports injuries for both adults and children?

Remember, that you have the rest of your life to run, swim, bicycle, ski, lift weights do aerobics, play football and so forth. If you sit out for the time your doctor and physical therapist advises you, you’ll be back in the game sooner. If you try to be tough, an aggravating injury can become a serious threat and sideline you permanently.

Our Locations

Choose your preferred location